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Choking - infant under 1 year

Choking is when someone can't breathe because food, a toy, or other object is blocking the airway (throat or windpipe).

This article discusses choking in infants.

Considerations

Choking may result from a complete or partial blockage of the airway.

  • A complete blockage is a medical emergency.
  • A partial blockage can quickly become life threatening if the person cannot breathe enough.

Permanent brain damage can occur in as little as 4 minutes when a person does not get enough air. Rapid first aid for choking can save a life.

Causes

Choking in infants is usually caused by breathing in a small object that the baby has placed in their mouth, such as a button, coin, balloon, toy part, or watch battery.

Symptoms

The danger signs of choking are:

  • Bluish skin color
  • Difficulty breathing - ribs and chest pull inward
  • Loss of consciousness if blockage is not cleared
  • Inability to cry or make much sound
  • Weak, ineffective coughing
  • Soft or high-pitched sounds while inhaling

First Aid

Do NOT perform these steps if the infant is coughing hard or has a strong cry. Strong coughs and cries can push the object out of the airway.

If your child is not coughing forcefully or does not have a strong cry, follow these steps:

  1. Lay the infant face down, along your forearm. Use your thigh or lap for support. Hold the infant's chest in your hand and jaw with your fingers. Point the infant's head downward, lower than the body.
  2. Give up to 5 quick, forceful blows between the infant's shoulder blades. Use the palm of your free hand.

If the object does not come out of the airway after 5 blows:

  1. Turn the infant face-up. Use your thigh or lap for support. Support the head.
  2. Place 2 fingers on the middle of his breastbone just below the nipples.
  3. Give up to 5 quick thrusts down, compressing the chest 1/3 to 1/2 the depth of the chest.
  4. Continue 5 back blows followed by 5 chest thrusts until the object is dislodged or the infant loses alertness (becomes unconscious).

IF THE INFANT LOSES ALERTNESS

If the child becomes unresponsive, stops breathing, or turns blue:

  • Shout for help.
  • Give infant CPR . Call 911 after 1 minute of CPR.
  • If you can see the object blocking the airway, try to remove it with your finger. Try to remove an object only if you can see it.

Do Not

  • Do NOT perform choking first aid if the infant is coughing forcefully, has a strong cry, or is breathing enough. However, be ready to act if the symptoms worsen.
  • Do NOT try to grasp and pull out the object if the infant is alert (conscious).
  • Do NOT do back blows and chest thrusts if the infant stops breathing for other reasons, such as asthma, infection, swelling, or a blow to the head. Do give infant CPR in these cases.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

If an infant is choking:

  • Tell someone to call 911 while you begin first aid.
  • If you are alone, shout for help and begin first aid.

Always call your doctor after a child has been choking, even if you successfully remove the object from the airway and the infant seems fine.

Prevention

  • Don't give children under 3 years old balloons or toys with fragile or small parts.
  • Keep infants away from buttons, popcorn, coins, grapes, nuts, or similar items.
  • Watch infants and toddlers while they are eating. Do not allow a child to crawl around while eating. Childproof your home.
  • The earliest safety lesson is "No!"

References

Manno M. Pediatric respiratory emergencies: Upper airway obstruction and infections. In: Marx J, ed. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2009:chap 166.

Updated: 7/20/2013

Jacob L. Heller, MD, MHA, Emergency Medicine, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.


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