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Bunion removal - discharge

Alternate Names

Bunionectomy - discharge; Hallux valgus correction - discharge

When you were in the hospital

You had surgery to repair a bunion. The surgeon made an incision (cut) in your skin to expose the bones and joint of your big toe. Your surgeon then repaired your deformed toe. You may have screws, wires, or a plate holding your toe joint together.

What to expect at home

You may have swelling in your foot. Keep your leg propped up on 1 or 2 pillows under your foot or calf muscle when you are sitting or lying down to reduce swelling. Swelling may last 9 - 12 months.

Wound care

Keep the dressing around your incision clean and dry until it is removed. Take sponge baths or cover your foot and dressing with a plastic bag when you take showers. Make sure water cannot leak into the bag.

Activity

You may need to wear a surgical shoe or cast for up to 8 weeks to keep your foot in the right position as it heals.

You will need to use a walker, cane, or crutches. Check with your surgeon before putting weight on your foot. You may be able to put some weight on your foot and walk short distances 2 or 3 weeks after surgery.

You will need to do exercises that will strengthen the muscles around your ankle and maintain the range of motion in your foot. Your doctor or a physical therapist will teach you these exercises.

When you are able to wear shoes again, wear only athletic shoes or soft leather shoes for at least 3 months. Choose shoes that have plenty of room in the toe box. Do not wear narrow shoes or high heels for at least 6 months, if ever.

Pain

Your doctor will give you a prescription for pain medicine. Get it filled when you go home so you have it when you need it. Take your pain medicine before you start having pain so that it doesn't get too bad.

Taking ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or another anti-inflammatory medicine may also help. Ask your doctor what other medicines are safe to take with your pain medicine.

When to call the doctor

Call your doctor or nurse if:

  • Your dressing becomes loose, comes off, or gets wet
  • You have a fever or chills
  • Your foot around the incision is warm or red
  • Your incision is bleeding
  • Your pain does not go away after you take pain medicine
  • You have swelling, pain, and redness in your calf muscle

References

Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics

Updated: 11/15/2012

C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.


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