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Heartburn - what to ask your doctor

You have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This condition causes food or stomach acid to come back into your esophagus from your stomach. This process is called reflux. It can cause heartburn, chest pain, cough, or hoarseness.

Below are some questions you may want to ask your doctor or nurse to help you take care of your heartburn and reflux.

Alternate Names

What to ask your doctor about heartburn and reflux; Reflux - what to ask your doctor; GERD - what to ask your doctor; Gastroesophageal reflux disease - what to ask your doctor

Questions

If I have heartburn, can I treat myself or do I need to see the doctor?

What foods will make my heartburn worse?

How can I change the way I eat to help my heartburn?

  • How long should I wait after eating before lying down?
  • How long should I wait after eating before exercising?

Will losing weight help my symptoms?

Do cigarettes, alcohol, and caffeine make my heartburn worse?

If I have heartburn at night, what changes should I make to my bed?

What medicines will help my heartburn?

  • Will antacids help my heartburn?
  • Will other medicines help my symptoms?
  • Do I need a prescription to buy heartburn medicines?
  • Do these drugs have side effects?

How do I know if I have a more serious problem?

  • When should I call the doctor?
  • What other tests or procedures will I need if my heartburn does not go away?
  • Can heartburn be a sign of cancer?

Are there surgeries that help with heartburn and reflux?

  • How are the surgeries done? What are the risks?
  • How well do the surgeries work?
  • Will I still need to take medicine for my reflux after surgery?
  • Will I ever need to have another surgery for my reflux?

Updated: 2/10/2013

David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.


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