Navigate Up

Cancer Center - A-Z Index

#
Q
Y

Print This Page

Factitious hyperthyroidism

Factitious hyperthyroidism is higher-than-normal thyroid hormone levels in the blood that occur from taking too much thyroid hormone medication.

Alternative Names

Factitious thyrotoxicosis; thyrotoxicosis factitia; thyrotoxicosis medicamentosa

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

The thyroid gland produces the hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). In most cases of hyperthyroidism , the thyroid gland itself produces too much of these hormones.

However, hyperthyroidism can also be caused by taking too much thyroid hormone medication for hypothyroidism . This is called factitious hyperthyroidism. When this occurs because the prescribed dose of hormone medication is too high, it is called iatrogenic, or "doctor-induced," hyperthyroidism.

Factitious hyperthyroidism can also occur when a patient intentionally takes too much thyroid hormone, such as in people:

  • Who have psychiatric disorders such as Munchausen syndrome
  • Who are trying to lose weight
  • Who want to get compensation from the insurance company

Children may take thyroid hormone pills accidentally.

In rare cases, factitious hyperthyroidism is caused by eating meat contaminated with thyroid gland tissue.

Symptoms

The symptoms of factitious hyperthyroidism are the same as those of hyperthyroidism caused by the thyroid gland, except that:

  • There is no goiter . The thyroid gland is usually small.
  • The eyes do not bulge, as they do in Graves disease (the most common type of hyperthyroidism).
  • The skin over the shins does not thicken, as it sometimes does in people who have Graves disease.

Signs and tests

Tests used to diagnose factitious hyperthyroidism include:

Treatment

You must stop taking thyroid hormone. If you need to take this medicine, you will need to reduce the dose.

You should be re-checked in 2 - 4 weeks to be sure that the signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism are gone. This also helps to confirm the diagnosis.

People with Munchausen syndrome will need mental health treatment and follow-up.

Expectations (prognosis)

Factitious hyperthyroidism will clear up on its own when you stop taking or lower the dose of thyroid hormone.

Complications

When factitious hyperthyroidism lasts a long time, patients are at risk for the same complications of untreated or improperly treated hyperthyroidism caused by the thyroid gland.

These complications include:

Calling your health care provider

Contact your health care provider if you experience any of the symptoms of hyperthyroidism.

Prevention

Thyroid hormone should be taken only by prescription and under the supervision of a licensed physician.

Updated: 6/4/2012

Shehzad Topiwala, MD, Chief Consultant Endocrinologist, Premier Medical Associates, The Villages, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc.


©  UPMC | Affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences
Supplemental content provided by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions. All rights reserved.

For help in finding a doctor or health service that suits your needs, call the UPMC Referral Service at 412-647-UPMC (8762) or 1-800-533-UPMC (8762). Select option 1.

UPMC is an equal opportunity employer. UPMC policy prohibits discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, age, sex, genetics, sexual orientation, marital status, familial status, disability, veteran status, or any other legally protected group status. Further, UPMC will continue to support and promote equal employment opportunity, human dignity, and racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity. This policy applies to admissions, employment, and access to and treatment in UPMC programs and activities. This commitment is made by UPMC in accordance with federal, state, and/or local laws and regulations.

Medical information made available on UPMC.com is not intended to be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. You should not rely entirely on this information for your health care needs. Ask your own doctor or health care provider any specific medical questions that you have. Further, UPMC.com is not a tool to be used in the case of an emergency. If an emergency arises, you should seek appropriate emergency medical services.

For UPMC Mercy Patients: As a Catholic hospital, UPMC Mercy abides by the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services, as determined by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. As such, UPMC Mercy neither endorses nor provides medical practices and/or procedures that contradict the moral teachings of the Roman Catholic Church.

© UPMC
Pittsburgh, PA, USA UPMC.com