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Gonococcal Arthritis

Gonococcal arthritis is inflammation of a joint due to a gonorrhea infection.

Alternative Names

Disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI)

Causes

Gonococcal arthritis is an infection of a joint. It occurs in people who have gonorrhea caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Gonococcal arthritis affects women more often than men, and it is most common among sexually active adolescent girls.

Two forms of gonococcal arthritis exist:

  • One form involves skin rashes and many joints, usually large joints such as the knee, wrist, and ankle.
  • The second, less common form involves the spread of the bacteria through the blood (disseminated gonococcemia), which leads to infection of a joint, sometimes more than one joint.

Symptoms

Exams and Tests

Blood cultures should be checked in all cases of possible gonococcal arthritis.

Tests will be done to check for a gonorrhea infection. This may involve taking samples of tissue, stool, joint fluids, or other body material and sending them to a lab for examination under a microscope. Examples of such tests include:

Treatment

The gonorrhea infection must be treated.

There are two aspects of treating a sexually transmitted disease, especially one as easily spread as gonorrhea. The first is to cure the infected person. The second is to locate, test, and treat all sexual contacts of the infected person to prevent further spread of the disease.

Some locations allow you to take counseling information and treatment to your partner(s) yourself. In other locations, the health department will contact your partner(s).

A standardized treatment routine is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Your health care provider will determine the best and most up-to-date treatment. A follow-up visit 7 days after treatment is important, if the infection was complicated, to recheck blood tests and confirm that the infection was cured.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Symptoms usually improve within 1 to 2 days of starting treatment. Full recovery can be expected.

Possible Complications

Untreated, this condition may lead to persistent joint pain.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of gonorrhea or gonococcal arthritis.

Prevention

Not having sexual intercourse (abstinence) is the only sure method of preventing gonorrhea. A monogamous sexual relationship with a person who you know does not have any sexually transmitted disease (STD) can reduce your risk. Monogamous means you and your partner do not have sex with any other people.

You can greatly lower your risk of infection with an STD by using a condom every time you have sex. Condoms are available for both men and women, but are most commonly worn by the man. A condom must be used properly every time.

Treating all sexual partners is essential to prevent re-infection.

References

Cook PP, Siraj DS. Bacterial arthritis. In: Firestein GS, Budd RC, Gabriel SE, et al., eds. Kelly’s Textbook of Rheumotology. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 109.

Matteson EL, Osmon DR. Infections of bursae, joints, and bones. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman’s Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 280.

Updated: 5/19/2013

Jatin M. Vyas, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Assistant in Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.


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