Navigate Up

Full Library - A-Z Index


Print This Page

Hymenolepiasis

Hymenolepiasis is infestation by one of two species of tapeworm : Hymenolepis nana or Hymenolepis diminuta.

Alternative Names

Dwarf tapeworm infection; Rat tapeworm; Tapeworm - infection

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Hymenolepis live in warm climates and are common in the southern United States. Insects eat the eggs of these worms.

Humans and other animals become infected when they intentionally or unintentionally eat material contaminated by insects (including fleas associated with rats). In an infected person, it is possible for the worm's entire life cycle to be completed in the bowel, so infection can last for years.

Hymenolepis nana infections are much more common than Hymenolepis diminuta infections in humans. These infections used to be common in the southeastern United States, in crowded environments and in people who were confined to institutions. However, the disease occurs throughout the world.

Symptoms

Symptoms occur only with heavy infections. Symptoms include:

  • Diarrhea
  • Gastrointestinal discomfort
  • Itchy anus
  • Poor appetite
  • Weakness

Signs and tests

Examination of the stool for eggs confirms the diagnosis.

Treatment

The treatment for this condition is a single dose of praziquantel, repeated in 10 days.

Expectations (prognosis)

Expect full recovery following treatment.

Complications

  • Abdominal discomfort
  • Dehydration from prolonged diarrhea

Calling your health care provider

Call your health care provider if chronic diarrhea or abdominal cramping are present.

Prevention

Good hygiene, public health and sanitation programs, and elimination of rats help prevent the spread of hymenolepiasis.

References

Blanton R. Adult tapeworm infections. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton BF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 19th Ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 294.

Richardz FO Jr. Diphyllobothrium, Dipylidium, and Hymenolepsis species. In: Long SS, ed. Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier; 2008:chap: 279.

Updated: 9/1/2013

Jatin M. Vyas, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Assistant in Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.


©  UPMC | Affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences
Supplemental content provided by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions. All rights reserved.

For help in finding a doctor or health service that suits your needs, call the UPMC Referral Service at 412-647-UPMC (8762) or 1-800-533-UPMC (8762). Select option 1.

UPMC is an equal opportunity employer. UPMC policy prohibits discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, age, sex, genetics, sexual orientation, marital status, familial status, disability, veteran status, or any other legally protected group status. Further, UPMC will continue to support and promote equal employment opportunity, human dignity, and racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity. This policy applies to admissions, employment, and access to and treatment in UPMC programs and activities. This commitment is made by UPMC in accordance with federal, state, and/or local laws and regulations.

Medical information made available on UPMC.com is not intended to be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. You should not rely entirely on this information for your health care needs. Ask your own doctor or health care provider any specific medical questions that you have. Further, UPMC.com is not a tool to be used in the case of an emergency. If an emergency arises, you should seek appropriate emergency medical services.

For UPMC Mercy Patients: As a Catholic hospital, UPMC Mercy abides by the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services, as determined by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. As such, UPMC Mercy neither endorses nor provides medical practices and/or procedures that contradict the moral teachings of the Roman Catholic Church.

© UPMC
Pittsburgh, PA, USA UPMC.com