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Clubbing of the fingers or toes

Clubbing is changes in the areas under and around the toenails and fingernails that occur with some disorders. The nails also show changes.

Alternative Names

Clubbing

Considerations

Common symptoms of clubbing:

  • The nail beds soften. The nails may seem to "float" instead of being firmly attached.
  • The nails forms a sharper angle with the cuticle.
  • The last part of the finger may appear large or bulging. It may also be warm and red.
  • The nail curves downward so it looks like the round part of an upside-down spoon.

Clubbing can develop quickly, often within weeks. It also can go away quickly when its cause is treated.

Common Causes

Lung cancer is the most common cause of clubbing. Clubbing often occurs in heart and lung diseases that reduce the amount of oxygen in the blood. These may include:

Other causes of clubbing:

Call your health care provider if

If you notice clubbing, call your health care provider.

What to expect at your health care provider's office

A person with clubbing often has symptoms of another condition. Diagnosing that condition is based on:

  • Family history
  • Medical history
  • Physical exam that looks at the lungs and chest

The health care provider may ask questions such as:

  • Do you have any trouble breathing?
  • Do you have clubbing of the fingers, toes, or both?
  • When did you first notice this? Do you think it's getting worse?
  • Does the skin ever have a blue color?
  • What other symptoms do you have?

The following tests may be done:

There is no treatment for the clubbing itself. The cause of clubbing can be treated, however.

References

Murray JF, Schraufnagel DE. History and physical examinations. In: Mason RJ, Broaddus VC, Martin TR, et al. Murray & Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier;2010:chap 17.

Updated: 5/10/2013

Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.


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