Navigate Up

Full Library - A-Z Index


Print This Page

Abscess scan - radioactive

Radioactive abscess scan looks abscesses in the body using a radioactive material. An abscess occurs when pus collects due to an infection.

Alternative Names

Radioactive abscess scan; Abscess scan

How the test is performed

Blood is drawn from a vein, most often on the inside of the elbow or the back of the hand.

  • The site is cleaned with germ-killing medicine (antiseptic).
  • The health care provider wraps an elastic band around the upper arm to apply pressure to the area and make the vein swell with blood.
  • Next, the health care provider gently inserts a needle into the vein. The blood collects into an airtight vial or tube attached to the needle.
  • The elastic band is removed from your arm.
  • The puncture site is covered to stop any bleeding.

The blood sample is then sent to a lab. There the white blood cells are tagged with a radioactive substance called indium. The cells are then injected back into a vein body through another needle stick.

You will need to return to the office 6-24 hours later. At that time, you will have a nuclear medicine scan to see if white blood cells have gathered in areas of your body where they would not be normally.

How to prepare for the test

Most of the time you do not need special preparation. You will need to sign a consent form.

For the test, you will need to wear a hospital gown or loose clothing. You will need to take off all jewelry.

Tell the health care provider if you are pregnant. This procedure is NOT recommended if you are pregnant or trying to become pregnant. Women of childbearing age (before menopause) should use some form of birth control during the course of this procedure.

Tell your health care provider if you have or had any of the following medical conditions, procedures, or treatments, as they can interfere with test results:

How the test will feel

Some people feel a little pain when the needle is inserted to draw blood. Others feel only a prick or sting. Afterward, there may be some throbbing.

The nuclear medicine scan is painless. It may be a little uncomfortable to lie flat and still on the scanning table. This is only for a short time.

Why the test is performed

An abscess may form after surgery, or it may form on its own. Symptoms of an abscess depend on where it is found, but may include:

  • Fever
  • Not feeling well (malaise)
  • Pain

This test is used to locate an abscess in the body. Often, other imaging tests such as an ultrasound or CT scan may be done first.

Normal Values

Normal findings would show no abnormal gathering of white blood cells.

What abnormal results mean

A gathering of white blood cells outside of the normal areas is a sign of either an abscess or other type of inflammatory process.

Some types of abscess are:

What the risks are

  • Some bruising may occur at the site of injection.
  • There is always a slight chance of infection when the skin is broken.
  • There is low-level radiation exposure.

The test is controlled so that you get only the smallest amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most experts feel that the risk is very low compared with the benefits.

Pregnant women and children are more sensitive to the risks of the x-ray.

References

Segerman D, Miles KA. Radionuclide imaging: general principles. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging. 5th ed. New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone;2008:chap 7.

Wilson DJ, Berendt AR. Bone and soft tissue infection. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging. 5th ed. New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone;2008:chap 51.

Updated: 11/9/2012

David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, David R. Eltz, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.


©  UPMC | Affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences
Supplemental content provided by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions. All rights reserved.

For help in finding a doctor or health service that suits your needs, call the UPMC Referral Service at 412-647-UPMC (8762) or 1-800-533-UPMC (8762). Select option 1.

UPMC is an equal opportunity employer. UPMC policy prohibits discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, age, sex, genetics, sexual orientation, marital status, familial status, disability, veteran status, or any other legally protected group status. Further, UPMC will continue to support and promote equal employment opportunity, human dignity, and racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity. This policy applies to admissions, employment, and access to and treatment in UPMC programs and activities. This commitment is made by UPMC in accordance with federal, state, and/or local laws and regulations.

Medical information made available on UPMC.com is not intended to be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. You should not rely entirely on this information for your health care needs. Ask your own doctor or health care provider any specific medical questions that you have. Further, UPMC.com is not a tool to be used in the case of an emergency. If an emergency arises, you should seek appropriate emergency medical services.

For UPMC Mercy Patients: As a Catholic hospital, UPMC Mercy abides by the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services, as determined by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. As such, UPMC Mercy neither endorses nor provides medical practices and/or procedures that contradict the moral teachings of the Roman Catholic Church.

© UPMC
Pittsburgh, PA, USA UPMC.com