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Synovial biopsy

A synovial biopsy is the removal of a piece of tissue lining a joint for examination. The tissue is called the synovial membrane.

Alternative Names

Biopsy - synovial membrane

How the test is performed

The test is done in the operating room during an arthroscopy.

The health care provider will inject a numbing medicine (local anesthetic) into the area. An instrument called a trocar is inserted into the joint space. This tool helps push fluid in and out of the area. A biopsy grasper is inserted through the trocar and turned to cut out a tissue segment.

The tools are removed. A bandage is applied.

How to prepare for the test

Tell your health care provider:

  • If you are pregnant
  • If you ever had a problem with anesthesia
  • If you have any drug allergies
  • If you have bleeding problems
  • What medications you are taking (including any herbal medicines and supplements)

How the test will feel

With the local anesthetic, you will feel a prick and a burning sensation. As the trocar is inserted, there will be some discomfort.

Why the test is performed

Synovial biopsy helps diagnose gout , bacterial infections, or other infections. It can be used to diagnose certain autoimmune disorders, like rheumatoid arthritis.

Normal Values

The synovial membrane structure is normal.

What abnormal results mean

Synovial biopsy may identify the following conditions:

The test may help diagnose rheumatoid arthritis , lupus, and other autoimmune diseases.

What the risks are

There is a very slight chance of infection and bleeding. Rarely, there is a chance of the needle striking a nerve or blood vessel.

Special considerations

 You will need to keep the wound clean and dry until your doctor or nurse says it is okay to get it wet.

References

El-Gabalawy HS. Synovial fluid analysis, synovial biopsy, and synovial pathology. In: Firestein GS, Budd RC, Harris ED Jr., et al, eds. Kelley's Textbook of Rheumatology. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier;2008:chap 48.

Updated: 8/11/2012

Linda J. Vorvick, MD, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Washington School of Medicine; and C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.


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