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Health screening - men - age 18 - 39

All adults should visit their health care provider from time to time, even if they are healthy. The purpose of these visits is to:

  • Screen for diseases
  • Assess risk of future medical problems
  • Help developĀ a healthy lifestyle
  • Update vaccinations
  • Maintain a relationship with a doctor in case of an illness

Alternative Names

Health maintenance visit - men - age 18 - 39; Physical exam - men - age 18 - 39; Yearly exam - men - age 18 - 39; Checkup - men - age 18 - 39; Men's health - age 18 - 39

Information

Even if you feel fine, it is still important to see your health care provider regularly to check for potential problems. Most people who have high blood pressure don't even know it. The only way to find out is to have your blood pressure checked regularly. Likewise, high blood sugar and high cholesterol levels often do not produce any symptoms until the disease becomes advanced.

There are specific times when you should see your health care provider. Age-specific guidelines are as follows:

  • Blood pressure screening:
    • Have your blood pressure checked every 2 years unless it is 120-139/80-89 Hg or higher. Then have it checked every year.
    • Watch for blood pressure screenings in your area. Ask your health care provider if you can stop in to have your blood pressure checked. Check your blood pressure using the automated machines at local grocery stores and pharmacies.
    • If the top number (systolic number) is greater than 130 or the bottom number (diastolic number) is greater than 85, call your doctor.
    • If you have diabetes, heart disease, kidney problems, or certain other conditions, you may need to be monitored more closely.
  • Cholesterol screening and heart disease prevention:
    • Men over age 34 should be checked every 5 years.
    • If you have risk factors for heart disease, such as diabetes, start getting screened earlier, at age 20.
    • If you have diabetes, heart disease, kidney problems, or certain other conditions, you may need to be monitored more closely.
  • Dental exam:
    • Go to the dentist every year for an exam and cleaning.
  • Eye exam:
    • If you have vision problems, have an eye exam every 2 years.
  • Immunizations:
    • After age 19, you should have a tetanus-diphtheria and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine once as part of your tetanus-diphtheria vaccines. You should have a tetanus-diphtheria booster every 10 years.
    • You should get a flu shot each year.
    • You should get the HPV vaccine if you have not already.
    • Your doctor may recommend other immunizations if you have certain medical conditions, such as diabetes.
  • Infectious disease screening:
    • Depending on your lifestyle and medical history, you may need to be screened for infections such as syphilis , chlamydia , and HIV , as well as other infections.
  • Preventive health visits should be every 2 years, and may include:
    • Checking height and weight
    • Screening for alcohol and tobacco use
    • Screening for depression

References

Atkins D, Barton M. The periodic health examination. In:Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 14.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recommended adult immunization schedule -- United States, 2012. MMWR.2011;61(4):1-7.

Greenland P, Alpert JS, Beller GA, Benjamin EJ, Budoff MJ, Fayad ZA, et al. 2010 ACCF/AHA guideline for assessment of cardiovascular risk in asymptomatic adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. Circulation. 2010;122(25):e584-e636.

Updated: 6/1/2012

David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc.


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