Navigate Up

Full Library - A-Z Index


Print This Page

Prostatectomy - Series

Normal

The prostate gland is an organ that surrounds the urinary urethra in men. It secretes fluid which mixes with sperm to make semen. The urethra carries urine from the bladder, through the prostate gland to the penis.

Prostatectomy - Series

Indications

With the exception of skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer among men in the United States. Early detection may result from a blood test called a PSA (prostate-specific antigen), and/or a digital rectal exam. The digital rectal exam checks the rear surface of the prostate gland for any abnormalities. A lump or hardness found during the exam might be a sign of prostate cancer.

Indications

Incision

There are two main surgical methods used for removing the prostate gland. The first method is called the "perineal" method. An incision is made in the perineum, which is the area between the base of the scrotum and the anus.

Incision

Incision

The second surgical method of prostatectomy is called the "suprapubic" approach. An incision is made in the abdomen, just below the umbilicus, which extends downward to the pubic bone.

Incision

Normal

The suprapubic approach allows for removal of the lymph nodes and the ability to perform a nerve sparing modification that might prevent impotence post surgery.

Normal

Aftercare

Patients with prostate cancer might require radiation therapy after their surgery. Results depend on the extent of their disease, and the response of the tumor to resection (removal) and radiotherapy.

Aftercare

Updated: 8/10/2009

David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc. Also reviewed by Scott Miller, MD, Urologist, private practice, Atlanta, Georgia.


©  UPMC | Affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences
Supplemental content provided by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions. All rights reserved.

For help in finding a doctor or health service that suits your needs, call the UPMC Referral Service at 412-647-UPMC (8762) or 1-800-533-UPMC (8762). Select option 1.

UPMC is an equal opportunity employer. UPMC policy prohibits discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, age, sex, genetics, sexual orientation, marital status, familial status, disability, veteran status, or any other legally protected group status. Further, UPMC will continue to support and promote equal employment opportunity, human dignity, and racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity. This policy applies to admissions, employment, and access to and treatment in UPMC programs and activities. This commitment is made by UPMC in accordance with federal, state, and/or local laws and regulations.

Medical information made available on UPMC.com is not intended to be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. You should not rely entirely on this information for your health care needs. Ask your own doctor or health care provider any specific medical questions that you have. Further, UPMC.com is not a tool to be used in the case of an emergency. If an emergency arises, you should seek appropriate emergency medical services.

For UPMC Mercy Patients: As a Catholic hospital, UPMC Mercy abides by the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services, as determined by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. As such, UPMC Mercy neither endorses nor provides medical practices and/or procedures that contradict the moral teachings of the Roman Catholic Church.

© UPMC
Pittsburgh, PA, USA UPMC.com