Navigate Up

UPMC/University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences
‚Äč
Patients and medical professionals may call 1-800-533-UPMC (8762) for more information.

UPMC Media Relations

University Of Pittsburgh Scientists Win Prestigious Award For Outstanding Contribution To Cancer Research

PITTSBURGH, June 9, 2003 Yuan Chang, M.D., and Patrick S. Moore, M.D., M.P.H. have been awarded the Charles S. Mott Prize, bestowed annually by the General Motors Cancer Research Foundation (GMCRF), for the most recent outstanding contribution to the cause or prevention of cancer.

The husband-and-wife team is from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine where Dr. Chang is professor of pathology and Dr. Moore is professor of molecular genetics and biochemistry and director of the Molecular Virology Program at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI).

Drs. Chang and Moore will be presented with the $250,000 Mott Prize at a ceremony that concludes GMCRFs Annual Scientific Conference, June 10-11, at the U.S. Department of State in Washington, D.C.

This award is one of the top annual awards in cancer research internationally as well as one of the most prestigious prizes ever awarded to a University of Pittsburgh faculty member, said Arthur S. Levine, M.D., senior vice chancellor for the Health Sciences and dean, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. In fact, the honor has been bestowed on only a select number of the worlds top scientists, nine of whom have gone on to win Nobel prizes.

Drs. Chang and Moore were honored with the Mott Prize for their discovery of Kaposis sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), which causes Kaposis sarcoma the most common malignancy occurring in AIDS patients. KSHV also is linked to other disorders that involve a compromised immune system.

Few scientists can lay claim to have truly found the cause of a cancer, said Ronald Herberman, M.D., director of UPCI and the UPMC Cancer Centers. Drs. Chang and Moore not only found the long-sought cause for a very common cancer in AIDS patients, but they also used their discovery to open new and exciting areas in cancer research. They are continuing to use innovative molecular biology techniques to understand the basis for KSHVs ability to cause cancer and to unearth new pathogens and undiscovered viruses.

Samuel A. Wells, Jr., M.D., president of the GMCRF, called Drs. Chang and Moore exemplary scientists and worthy recipients of the Mott Prize. They were chosen through a rigorous process conducted by a panel of prestigious international scientists, he said. Through this award, General Motors supports some of the worlds most gifted scientists who have made highly important discoveries leading to the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cancer.

General Motors established the Cancer Research Foundation in 1978 to recognize the outstanding accomplishments of basic scientists and clinical scientists in cancer research around the world. The Mott Prize, among the most prestigious in the field of medicine, is one of three awards GM announces annually.

The University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute is the only National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center in western Pennsylvania, serving a population of more than six million. UPCI is a recognized leader in providing innovative cancer prevention, detection, diagnosis and treatment; bio-medical research; compassionate patient care and support; and community outreach services. UPCI investigators are world-renowned for their work in clinical and basic research on cancer.

To read more news releases about cancer, please visit the Media Relations Cancer Archives.

©  UPMC | Affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences
Supplemental content provided by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions. All rights reserved.

For help in finding a doctor or health service that suits your needs, call the UPMC Referral Service at 412-647-UPMC (8762) or 1-800-533-UPMC (8762). Select option 1.

UPMC is an equal opportunity employer. UPMC policy prohibits discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, age, sex, genetics, sexual orientation, marital status, familial status, disability, veteran status, or any other legally protected group status. Further, UPMC will continue to support and promote equal employment opportunity, human dignity, and racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity. This policy applies to admissions, employment, and access to and treatment in UPMC programs and activities. This commitment is made by UPMC in accordance with federal, state, and/or local laws and regulations.

Medical information made available on UPMC.com is not intended to be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. You should not rely entirely on this information for your health care needs. Ask your own doctor or health care provider any specific medical questions that you have. Further, UPMC.com is not a tool to be used in the case of an emergency. If an emergency arises, you should seek appropriate emergency medical services.

For UPMC Mercy Patients: As a Catholic hospital, UPMC Mercy abides by the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services, as determined by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. As such, UPMC Mercy neither endorses nor provides medical practices and/or procedures that contradict the moral teachings of the Roman Catholic Church.

© UPMC
Pittsburgh, PA, USA UPMC.com