Navigate Up
UPMC/University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences
Senior Manager
Telephone: 412-578-9193 or 412-624-3212
Patients and medical professionals may call 1-800-533-UPMC (8762) for more information.

Our Experts 

University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Gets $8 Million From NIH to Lead Largest-Ever Research Effort Into Myositis

PITTSBURGH, August 13, 2007 Researchers from the division of rheumatology and clinical immunology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine are leading a worldwide effort to study a treatment for a rare autoimmune disorder called myositis, thanks to a five-year, $8 million contract from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Chester V. Oddis, M.D., professor of medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, is principal investigator for the effort, which involves 36 other scientists from 18 states and five countries, including Canada, the Czech Republic, Sweden, England and the United States.

Myositis is a general term for several conditions, including dermatomyositis, polymyositis, inclusion-body myositis and juvenile forms of myositis. Also known as inflammatory myopathies, they are musculoskeletal disorders characterized by muscle weakness thought to be autoimmune diseases. This means that the bodys immune system, which normally fights infections and viruses, for reasons unknown turns on itself and attacks the muscle tissue and sometimes skin, joints and lungs, causing rash, arthritis and shortness of breath.

The University of Pittsburgh-led study will evaluate the effectiveness of a drug called rituximab in adults and children diagnosed with dermatomyositis (a disease that causes muscle weakness and rash) and adults diagnosed with polymyositis, which is not associated with a rash. The study doctors want to know whether rituximab improves symptoms of these diseases.

Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody used and approved since 1997 by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of B-cell non-Hodgkins lymphoma. It was approved in February 2006 for adult rheumatoid arthritis patients with an inadequate response to anti-TNF (tumor necrosis factor) agents. In this study, rituximab is considered to be experimental because it is not FDA approved for the treatment of dermatomyositis or polymyositis. The study doctors believe that the symptoms of myositis are related to the presence of B cells in the blood and rituximab is being given to reduce the number of blood B cells. This drug has been used in other research studies in patients with other rheumatologic and autoimmune diseases.

A total of 202 participants will be included in the study, including 152 adults and 50 children, at 36 centers across North America and Europe, in a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial.

For more information or to enroll, call Sherrie Pryber at 412-647-3241.

 

©  UPMC | Affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences
Supplemental content provided by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions. All rights reserved.

For help in finding a doctor or health service that suits your needs, call the UPMC Referral Service at 412-647-UPMC (8762) or 1-800-533-UPMC (8762). Select option 1.

UPMC is an equal opportunity employer. UPMC policy prohibits discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, age, sex, genetics, sexual orientation, marital status, familial status, disability, veteran status, or any other legally protected group status. Further, UPMC will continue to support and promote equal employment opportunity, human dignity, and racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity. This policy applies to admissions, employment, and access to and treatment in UPMC programs and activities. This commitment is made by UPMC in accordance with federal, state, and/or local laws and regulations.

Medical information made available on UPMC.com is not intended to be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. You should not rely entirely on this information for your health care needs. Ask your own doctor or health care provider any specific medical questions that you have. Further, UPMC.com is not a tool to be used in the case of an emergency. If an emergency arises, you should seek appropriate emergency medical services.

For UPMC Mercy Patients: As a Catholic hospital, UPMC Mercy abides by the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services, as determined by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. As such, UPMC Mercy neither endorses nor provides medical practices and/or procedures that contradict the moral teachings of the Roman Catholic Church.

© UPMC
Pittsburgh, PA, USA UPMC.com