Bariatric Surgery Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are scientific studies of how a new medicine or treatment works in people.

Why Participate in a Clinical Trial?

The most common answer from our bariatric surgery research participants is that they want to help others who are in their situation.

Participating in bariatric surgery clinical trials will provide more, and better, information to help:

  • Patients considering bariatric surgery make their decisions.
  • Clinicians to provide the best possible care for their bariatric patients.

Current Clinical Trials on Bariatric Surgery

Learn more about our bariatric surgery clinical trials to see if participating in research is a good choice for you.

Please note that additional inclusion and exclusion criteria apply. Contact the study coordinator for more details.

Plicated Laparoscopic Adjustable Banding Study

This is a multicenter, randomized controlled clinical trial being done at UPMC and Duke University to compare standard laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding with laparoscopic adjustable banding and plication, which is a modified, investigational technique.

​Who can participate Men and women between the ages of 18 and 60 and a BMI between 35 and 55
​Who can't participate ​People who:
  • Have had prior bariatric or intestinal surgery
  • Have a family or patient history of autoimmune disease
  • Are unwilling to be randomized to a study group
​What we'll study

This study will compare standard laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding to a modified surgical technique where in addition to placing the band, the stomach is plicated or inverted, to reduce the overall size of the stomach. The study will observe weight loss and health changes in participants for 3 years after surgery. Participants will be blinded to which group they are randomized for the 3 year study period.

​How we'll conduct the study ​Participants will be randomly assigned to one of two groups:
  1. Standard laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding surgery
  2. Plicated laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding surgery
​Who to contact ​To learn more about this study or about participating in future clinical trials, please call
412-641-3739 or email snyders@upmc.edu.

 

 

Triabetes Study — test to compare medical and surgical treatments for type 2 diabetes

​Who can participate ​Currently closed to enrollment.
​Who can't participate ​People who:
  • Have had prior bariatric or foregut surgery.
  • Currently smoke.
  • Cannot exercise (walk a city block or climb a flight of stairs).
​What we'll study
  • ​The many unanswered questions about the best treatment for type 2 diabetes in patients with mild to moderate obesity.
  • Whether diabetes is influenced by the type of surgery or by the amount of weight lost, or if bariatric surgery is more effective than non-surgical weight loss induced by diet and physical activity.
  • The effectiveness of various bariatric surgery procedures versus an intensive behavioral intervention to induce weight loss with diet and increased physical activity.
  • The feasibility of performing this type of randomized trial.
​How we'll conduct the study ​Participants will be randomly assigned to one of three treatment arms:
  1. Gastric bypass
  2. Gastric banding
  3. Structured weight loss program
​Who to contact ​To learn more about this study or about participating in future clinical trials, please call
412-641-3743 or email piersonsk@upmc.edu

 

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