Acupuncture

What is Acupuncture?

  • Acupuncture involves inserting very thin needles into precise points on the body to promote healing and improve functioning.
  • Needles are placed into precise locations on the body known as acupuncture points.
  • The needles may be stimulated with electricity or heat.
  • Typically, the needling will cause a slight pinching sensation, but otherwise is not painful.
  • According to the traditional Chinese explanation, illness results from the blockage of the flow of energy or Qi through the body. According to this tradition, the use of acupuncture helps to open up the flow of Qi and restore balance to the system.
  • The western medicine explanation is that acupuncture needles send a mild pain message to the brain. The brain responds by sending a pain-relieving message electrically and chemically back to the body.

What Is the Background of Acupuncture?

  • Acupuncture was developed in China more than 2,500 years ago as part of a system of medical treatment that also includes the use of herbal agents, as well as a unique understanding of health and disease.
  • Acupuncture techniques have been adapted in various countries including Japan, Korea, France, and the United Kingdom, as well as the United States.
  • Acupuncture is most widely known as part of traditional oriental medicine. Other forms include auricular therapy, Korean hand acupuncture, and western medicine approaches. In particular, a form of electroacupuncture called percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PENS) has been used to treat localized musculoskeletal problems.
  • Research has shown benefit from acupuncture in the treatment of osteoarthritis and other musculoskeletal pain.

What Are the Indications For Acupuncture?

Acupuncture is most commonly used to treat:

  • Lower back pain
  • Headache
  • Neck pain
  • Tennis elbow
  • Sciatica
  • Spinal stenosis
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Nausea
  • Asthma
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Hypertension
  • Infertility
  • Menstrual cramps or irregularities
  • Tendonitis/bursitis
  • Perimenopausal symptoms
  • Depression

There is promising research supporting the use of acupuncture for conditions such as menstrual problems and nausea. It can also be used for other conditions, such as abdominal pain, hypertension, and other problems related to cancer or chemotherapy.

What Are the Contraindications?

Patients who are pregnant, have a pacemaker or heart condition, have a seizure disorder, or those with a bleeding disorder or taking blood thinners should discuss their condition with the acupuncturist before proceeding with acupuncture. While acupuncture can be used to treat symptoms in cancer patients, it should not be used in lieu of standard medical treatment.

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