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Brain Computer Interface Research Photos

Photo Gallery

Click the thumbnails below to download them in high resolution. Photo credit: "UPMC" (unless otherwise stated).

Jan Scheuermann brings a chocolate bar to her mouth.

Jan Scheuermann, who has quadriplegia, brings a chocolate bar to her mouth using a robot arm she is guiding with her thoughts. Research assistant Elke Brown, M.D., watches in the background.

Jan Scheuermann reaches with a thought-controlled robot arm for a chocolate bar.

Jan Scheuermann, who has quadriplegia, reaches with a thought-controlled robot arm for a chocolate bar held by research assistant Brian Wodlinger, Ph.D.

Jan Scheuermann gazes at a chocolate bar that she is about to eat.

Jan Scheuermann, who has quadriplegia, gazes at the chocolate bar she intends to guide into her mouth with a thought-controlled robot arm.

Jan Scheuermann prepares to take a bite of a chocolate bar.

Jan Scheuermann, who has quadriplegia, prepares to take a bite out of a chocolate bar she is guiding into her mouth with a thought-controlled robot arm while research assistant Brian Wodlinger, Ph.D., watches.

Jan Scheuermann takes a bite of a chocolate bar that she has guided to her mouth with a thought-controilled robotic arm.

Jan Scheuermann, who has quadriplegia, takes a bite out of a chocolate bar she has guided into her mouth with a thought-controlled robot arm. Research assistants Brian Wodlinger, Ph.D., and Elke Brown, M.D., watch in the background.

Andrew Schwartz shakes Jan Scheuermann's robot hand.

Researcher Andrew Schwartz, Ph.D., shakes Jan Scheuermann’s robot hand, which she calls Hector.

Andrew Schwartz, Ph.D., and Elizabeth Tyler-Kabara, M.D., Ph.D, talk with Jan Scheuermann.

Researchers Andrew Schwartz, Ph.D., and Elizabeth Tyler-Kabara, M.D., Ph.D., talk with Jan Scheuermann. Research assistants John Downey (facing camera) and Brian Wodlinger, Ph.D., chat in the background.

Jan Scheuermann reaches out with the thought-controlled robot arm to touch Jennifer Collinger's hand.

Jan Scheuermann reaches out with the thought-controlled robot arm to touch the hand of researcher Jennifer Collinger, Ph.D.

Jan Scheuermann stacks cones with a mind-controlled robot arm.

Jan Scheuermann stacks cones with a mind-controlled robot arm. Research assistant Brian Wodlinger, Ph.D., watches her work.

Jan Scheuermann is participating in a trial testing brain computer interface technology.

Jan Scheuermann, 53, of Whitehall Borough, has quadriplegia for more than nine years and is participating in a trial testing brain computer interface technology that allows her to move a robot arm with her thoughts.

 is participating in a trial testing brain computer interface technology

Jan Scheuermann stacks cones with a mind-controlled robot arm.

Jan Scheuermann guides a robot arm with her thoughts.

One Small Nibble, One Giant Bite; Woman Guides Robot Arm With Thoughts.

Study participant Tim Hemmes (right) reaching out to his researcher, Wei Wang, M.D., Ph.D. (left), using a brain-controlled prosthetic arm. Also pictured: Research team member Jennifer L. Collinger, Ph.D and Katie Schaffer.

Study participant Tim Hemmes (right) reaching out to his girlfriend, Katie Schaffer (left), using a brain-controlled prosthetic arm. Also pictured: Research team member Jennifer L. Collinger, Ph.D.

The prosthetic arm, designed by the John Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) and funded by the U.S. Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Photo credit: DARPA and JHU/APL​.

​The study's co-principal investigator and UPMC Rehabilitation Institute director Michael Boninger, M.D., and Mr. Hemmes.​

​Mr. Hemmes' reaction to reaching out to touch hands with someone for the first time in seven years.​

As part of testing, Mr. Hemmes willed the arm to reach for a ball placed onto specific areas of a board in front of him.​

In addition to the arm testing, Mr. Hemmes used his thoughts to guide a ball from the middle of a large television screen either up, down, left or right to a target, within a time limit.​

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