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Regenerative Medicine for Orthopaedic Injuries

Orthopaedic injuries can compromise mobility and hinder quality of life, and not just for professional athletes. At the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, we've been studying the forces on bones and joints for a long time. We’ve been working on:

  • Better ways to help heal orthopaedic injuries
  • Better artificial joints
  • Replacement tissue for cartilage and ligaments

Much of what we've learned has already improved surgical and rehabilitation techniques for orthopaedic injuries.

One of the first regenerative medicine treatments to become a commercial product, a scaffold called SIS (Small Intestinal Submucosa) that promotes the regrowth of soft tissue, is used to help regenerate shoulder rotator cuffs and knee ligaments. McGowan Institute deputy director Stephen Badylak, DVM, PhD, MD, pioneered this biologic material that has been effective in certain cases. Read more.

In the laboratory of McGowan Institute affiliated faculty member Prashant Kumta, PhD, one of the lab’s visions is to revolutionize metallic biomaterials and technologies to create life changing devices. This will lead to engineered systems that will interface with the human body to prolong and improve quality of life, specifically with craniofacial and orthopaedic applications. Dr. Kumta and his team’s goal is to engineer logical and clinically relevant options that could regenerate mineralized tissue (bone/tooth) formation utilizing a unique combination of evolutionary load-bearing biodegradable materials (metals), growth factors, and cell therapy. Read more.

McGowan Institute faculty member Freddie Fu, MD, is known worldwide for his pioneering surgical techniques to treat sports-related injuries to the knee and shoulder and his extensive scientific and clinical research in the biomechanics of such injuries. Because of his reputation, Dr. Fu attracts both athletic and non-athletic patients from all over the globe and has been featured in several publications. Read more.