Also part of the UPMC family:

The McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Merging Science with Technology to Treat Disease

Regenerative medicine uses clinical procedures to repair or replace damaged or diseased tissues and organs, versus some traditional therapies that just treat symptoms.

To realize the vast potential of tissue engineering and other techniques aimed at repairing damaged or diseased tissues and organs, the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and UPMC established the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine. The McGowan Institute serves as a single base of operations for the University’s leading scientists and clinical faculty working to develop tissue engineering, cellular therapies, and artificial and biohybrid organ devices.

The McGowan Institute is the most ambitious regenerative program in the nation, coupling biology, clinical science, and engineering. Success in our mission will impact patients’ lives, bring economic benefit, serve to train the next generation of researchers, and advance the expertise of our faculty in the basic sciences, engineering, and clinical sciences. Our efforts proudly build upon the pioneering achievements of the Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute.

While there are certain select therapies based on regenerative medicine principles now in clinical use, much work lies ahead to realize the potential of this growing field. Advances in the underlying science, engineering strategies to harness this science, and successful commercial activities are all required to bring new therapies to patients.

Regenerative Medicine Podcasts

The McGowan Institute sponsors a podcast series on regenerative medicine. Listen to some of the world's leading regenerative medicine researchers and physicians talk about their work.

Listen to the most recent podcasts.

News and Events

Researchers Regrow Damaged Nerves with Polymer and Protein

University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine researchers have created a biodegradable nerve guide — a polymer tube — filled with growth-promoting protein that can regenerate long sections of damaged nerves, without the need for transplanting stem cells or a donor nerve.


Dr. Fabrisia Ambrosio Named Co-PI on $3.8M R01 Grant

The National Institutes of Health recently awarded $3.8 million to the R01 Grant Project entitled “Physical exercise and blood-brain communication: Exosomes, Klotho and the Choroid Plexus.”  The project’s co-principal investigators include Radosveta Koldamova, MD, PhD and Fabrisia Ambrosio, MPT, PhD.


UPMC First in the U.S. to Implant Wireless Retinal Device

UPMC has implanted the first patient in the United States with a new wireless retinal device as part of a clinical trial aimed at restoring partial sight to patients with advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a disease that leads to permanent blindness.


Sepsis Kills 1 in 5 Globally, Double Previous Estimate

Twice as many people as previously believed are dying of sepsis worldwide, according to an analysis published in The Lancet and announced at the Critical Care Reviews annual meeting in Belfast. Among them are a disproportionately high number of children in poor areas.


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